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Broad Beans

Pod, purée and serve with a little fried garlic; blanched podded broad beans and peas, add some fried onion and serve with grilled halloumi and torn mint leaves. Top and tail very young broad beans and serve whole, in their pods, with a chunk of pecorino and some bread.

Peas

Ohh, yes peas! For those sunshine days and cosy evenings why not try pea, spinach and potato cakes, Cajun pea and potato salad with spring onion dressing, pan fried salmon with a pea and citrus crush or perhaps simply peas on toast.

Turnips

When they are young, try them lightly cooked in butter, braised or roasted or even eaten raw in salads. The main crop turnips which are larger and coarser and more similar to swedes can be boiled and mashed or used in soups and stews. As the bulbs get bigger so the flavour becomes more pronounced.

Savoy Cabbage

Dark-green winter cabbage with attractive, crinkled and blistered leaves and a robust flavour and texture. Steam, boil or braise, add to hearty peasant soups or stuff rolled-up whole leaves with a savoury minced meat and rice mixture.

Broccoli

Cook and drizzle with olive oil or melted butter or a handful of grated parmesan; add to a cheesy pasta bake; stir-fry in groundnut oil with chopped garlic and dry fried cashews, adding a drizzle of toasted sesame oil to the pan just before cooking ends.

Courgettes – Green and Yellow

They can be sliced thinly and eaten raw, cooked on a griddle, in a stir fry, or fried in a light batter as chips, grated and added to a quiche, or dressed up in a creamy lemon sauce and served with pasta, Recipes for courgettes come in as many shapes and sizes as the vegetable itself: varieties of this summer vegetable can range from small and flying-saucer shaped, to dark-green and tennis ball-sized, to long and yellow.

English Asparagus

Although the season is very short, English asparagus is well worth the wait for its unbeatable flavour and freshness. It is incredibly versatile, quick and easy to prepare and cook and there is no waste. How about asparagus, pancetta and parmesan linguine with chive cream or maybe beef and asparagus salad with honey dressing, radishes and cherry tomatoes? We have purple, white or the classic green.

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Spinach

Used in almost every cuisine across the world, spinach is an enormously popular green vegetable. The leaves can be either flat or slightly ruffled, and are a bright green when young, deepening to a more intense colour when older. The bitter flavour is distinctive – you either love it or hate it. The milder, young leaves can be eaten raw in a salad.

Watercress

With deep green leaves, and crisp, paler stems, watercress is related to mustard and is one of the strongest-tasting salad leaves available. It has a pungent, slightly bitter, peppery flavour and is highly nutritious.

Runner Beans

These beans can be chopped and added to rice dishes, sprinkled with sesame seeds as a side dish for Asian-style recipes, or served as a traditional British ‘veg’ with roast dinner.

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Rainbow Chard

The raw baby leaves of the coloured types look stunning in salads, and though they dull a little on cooking, a pile of young leaves, wilted and buttered with stems still attached, is still handsome on a plate. The adult plant gives you two vegetables in one: the crisp, robust stems and the abundant, delicately ruffled leaves. The leaves, though, taste of pure, iron-rich vegetabliness, somewhere between a mild kale and spinach. It’s a powerhouse of nutty, green-leaf flavour, so pair it with feisty partners: olives, cream, tomatoes, spices, strong cheese and smoked fish. It will not let you down.

Mushrooms

We have Girolle and Mousseron mushrooms, both looking good.

Girolle

These have a deliciously nutty and peppery flavour that works well in risottos, sauces or even a chicken and mushroom pie. Perfect paired with similarly rich flavours such as pheasant, chestnuts and bone marrow.

Mousseron

These have a rich, intense flavour – similar to porcini, but with more pronounced hazelnut notes. These mushrooms work well in slow-cooked dishes like casseroles, as they retain their robust flavour, and the slow-cooking softens their hard stems. Also try them in a sauce to top fish or chicken dishes or stir into durum wheat pasta.

Heritage Tomatoes

With their range and depth of eye catching colours, they are visually very appealing but it is the wonderful flavour and aroma that sets them apart. They are typified by the array of variety types, shapes, colours, sizes and flavours.

Heirloom Tomatoes

Any large, meaty, pink-red to deep-red heirloom makes a substantial bed for the playful combination of cherry tomatoes and Bing cherries. Although we love the fragrance of anise hyssop, mint, basil, or tarragon will also work nicely.

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English Strawberries

This succulent, fragrant fruit is as beautiful as it is flavourful. Dip whole strawberries into melted dark chocolate and set aside until firm, then serve as a tasty canapé at champagne receptions; the berries will complement a rosé bubbly. Garnish summer salads with slices of strawberries, stir the berries into meringues and whipped cream to make Eton mess, or sandwich them between sponge cakes or pastries such as millefeuille. Alternatively, sprinkle a few drops of balsamic vinegar or a dusting of freshly ground black pepper sparingly over strawberries to enhance their flavour.

Russet Apples

There are several different varieties, and whilst they are not necessarily related to each other, they tend to share some common characteristics – notably the attractive russet colouring, a sweeter flavour, and flesh which is firm rather than crunchy.

Gooseberries

Gooseberry recipes are a quintessential summer treat: Try gooseberry purée with mackerel or roast pork. Or pair them with elderflower for delicious gooseberry pies, tarts and crumbles. The high pectin content in the fruit makes an ideal gooseberry jam.

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Flat Peaches

How about chilled white peaches poached in rose syrup, or baked peaches with crushed amaretto biscuits. Baking peaches will make even slightly hard and unsweet peaches delicious! Warm, soft with their sugars concentrated – they are a joy. Or, perhaps a savoury and sweet chicken and grilled peach salad.